Articles publicats (CTFC)

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    Open Access
    Why and when do freshwater fish migrate? Observations of migration patterns of the native fishes from the Iberian Peninsula (SW Europe)
    (Asociación Ibérica de Limnología, 2024) Ordeix, Marc; Casals i Martí, Frederic
    We reviewed information on Iberian freshwater fish to characterize their migratory status and identify migration reasons and periods. Most species migrate (87.3 %; 62 species from 15 families). A large number are potamodromous species (45 species from 6 families) but diadromous species (17 species from 11 families) also exist, including anadromous (9 species) and catadromous (8 species). The spawning period is a primary driver of fish migration but feeding and refuge-associated migrations also take place. Sexual maturity is the most important cue triggering fish migration, and other important factors include water temperature, river flow, currents, salinity and photoperiod. Spawning and migrating periods are in general prolonged and vary among years, as a response to the environmental variability of Mediterranean river systems, which are the most frequent in the Iberian Peninsula. Migratory movements of the various native species of each site cover almost the whole or the whole year. Therefore, to allow fish migration, Iberian freshwaters should always be connected, or their fish passes should be permanently, or practically always, in operation.
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    Open Access
    Forest types outpaced tree species in centroid-based range shifts under global change
    (Frontiers, 2024) Abbasi, Akane O.; Woodall, Christopher W.; Gamarra, Javier G. P.; Hui, Cang; Picard, Nicolas; Ochuodho, Thomas; Miguel Magaña, Sergio de; Sahay, Rajeev; Fei, Songlin; Paquette, Alain; Chen, Han Y. H.; Catlin, Ann Christine; Liang, Jingjing
    Introduction: Mounting evidence suggests that geographic ranges of tree species worldwide are shifting under global environmental changes. Little is known, however, about if and how these species’ range shifts may trigger the range shifts of various types of forests. Markowitz’s portfolio theory of investment and its broad application in ecology suggest that the range shift of a forest type could differ substantially from the range shifts of its constituent tree species. Methods: Here, we tested this hypothesis by comparing the range shifts of forest types and the mean of their constituent species between 1970–1999 and 2000– 2019 across Alaska, Canada, and the contiguous United States using continentwide forest inventory data. We first identified forest types in each period using autoencoder neural networks and K-means cluster analysis. For each of the 43 forest types that were identified in both periods, we systematically compared historical range shifts of the forest type and the mean of its constituent tree species based on the geographic centroids of interpolated distribution maps. Results: We found that forest types shifted at 86.5 km·decade-1 on average, more than three times as fast as the average of constituent tree species (28.8 km·decade-1). We showed that a predominantly positive covariance of the species range and the change of species relative abundance triggers this marked difference.
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    Open Access
    Analysis of climate change impacts on the biogeographical patterns of species-specific productivity of socioeconomically important edible fungi in Mediterranean forest ecosystems
    (Elsevier, 2024) Morera, Albert; Miguel Magaña, Sergio de; LeBlanc, Hannah; Martínez de Aragón, Juan; Bonet Lledos, José Antonio
    In Mediterranean forests, many species of fungi produce fruiting bodies every autumn, some of which are of great social and economic interest as NTFPs. In addition, these fungi are an essential part of the biodiversity network that ensures the proper functioning of natural ecosystems and that is currently in check due to global change. Therefore, understanding the biogeographic patterns of species-specific fungal productivity is fundamental to anticipate possible changes in the socioeconomic value of our forests and to understand the role they play in the functioning of ecosystems in terms of mitigation and adaptation to climate change. In this study we estimate the future impact of climate change (in Catalonia region, between 2023 and 2100) on five fungal species with high socioeconomic interest in a broad bioclimatic gradient representative of the Mediterranean basin using high resolution at the landscape scale. To achieve this, we use predictive models based on machine learning algorithms and a fungal database resulting from the sampling of more than 100 permanent sampling plots over 20 years. We estimate that current and future productivity patterns differ among species, under different climate change scenarios and bioclimatic regions. Our results suggest that optimal productivity areas may be shifted to higher elevations, making those species with higher productivity at higher elevations the most affected by climate change. This would mean that some species with high socioeconomic value, such as Lactarius deliciosus and Boletus edulis, could be negatively affected in their total productivity in the study area. This study highlights the need to anticipate the potential effects of climate change on fungal productivity and in particular on high socioeconomic value species and to develop management policies oriented to maintain the important role of fungi in natural ecosystems.
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    Open Access
    Reply to: Satellite artifacts modulate FireCCILT11 global burned area
    (Nature Research, 2024) Cardil Forradellas, Adrián; Rodrigues, Marcos; Barbero, Renaud; Ramírez, Joaquin; Stoof, Cathelijne; Silva, Carlos Alberto; Mohan, Midhun; Gelabert Vadillo, Pere Joan; Miguel Magaña, Sergio de; Ortega, Macarena
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    Open Access
    Close-to-nature management effects on tree growth and soil moisture in Mediterranean mixed forests
    (Elsevier, 2023-09-30) Collado Coloma, Eduardo; Piqué i Nicolau, Míriam; Coello, Jaime; de-Dios-García, Javier; Coll Mir, Lluís
    Given the rising frequency of drought events, close-to-nature principles appear to be a suitable management option for promoting more adapted forests by increasing diversity and vitality (e.g., enhancing tree growth), while preserving soil moisture. In this study, we evaluate individual tree growth from selected trees (including future crop trees) and soil moisture responses to close-to-nature silvicultural treatments in sub-humid Mediterranean mixed forests in Catalonia (Northeastern Spain). We relied on 18 permanent sample plots (i.e., 9 pairedplots: managed / control) representing a competition intensity gradient and different forest types (dominated by either Quercus ilex, Castanea sativa, Quercus pubescens/petraea, Pinus pinea and Pinus sylvestris). From them, 8 plots were subject to intense monitoring in terms of intra-annual tree radial growth, monitored by manual band dendrometers, and hourly soil water content. Basal area increment, and annual and seasonal (May, June, July) radial increment rates were computed as a proxy of tree growth for all plots and for those plots with dendrometers, respectively. We conducted Spearman correlation analyses between tree growth, competition intensity, soil water content and climatic variables to detect significant relations between forest management and variables of interest (e.g., basal area increment, radial increment rates, soil water content). To investigate further into the effect of this silviculture on tree growth, we used mixed-effects models using as predictors variables related to competition intensity and forest management (dummy variable) in combination with monthly soil water content variables. We observed that basal area increment and radial increment rates had a positive (albeit weak) correlation with forest management, while competition intensity had a negative correlation with both variables. The models were not capable of detecting clear species-specific tree growth responses to competition. Compared to control plots, on average, the treatments boosted soil water content by about a 10% in managed plots in Q. ilex, P. sylvestris and P. pinea stands, and this increase was particularly significant during the growing season. Moreover, the best-fitted model predicted seasonal radial increment rates using not only forest management and competition variables, but also monthly soil water content factors. Our results suggest that close-tonature- forest management may reduce the vulnerability to drought by increasing tree vitality and soil moisture, at least in the short term (<3 years).